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Travel Heated Seat Cover – Launching on The Grommet

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We are launching on the Grommet on Tuesday, Sept. 29th. Since 2008, The Grommet has launched more than 2,000 consumer products in 16 consumer categories. Only 3% of all products considered by The Grommet are selected. Check it out here: https://www.thegrommet.com/chaheati.

HEATED FREEDOM
Take the luxury of your heated car seat wherever you go. The Chaheati cover is cordless—charge it from home or the car and enjoy a toasty seat anywhere.

Maker Kyle Smith was enjoying a bonfire one chilly night when he realized that his wife kept getting out of her seat to warm her back. When he couldn’t find a portable heat solution, he decided to make his own.

Chaheati uses energy-efficient carbon fiber instead of heating coils, so there are no hot spots. The weather-resistant, durable design makes it great for outdoor use. Charge the battery and enjoy hours of heat tailgating, on a fall camping trip, or watching the kids’ soccer game.

This heated seat pad can also provide relief from sore muscles and back pain. The infrared technology and even heat are often used by therapists for deep muscle penetration.

Soothe a sore back and keep warm anywhere—with Chaheati, any seat is a heated seat.

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Chaheati at Cardinal’s Spring Training

Our trip to Jupiter, FL to watch the St. Louis Cardinals in the last few games of Spring Training became quite the journey. I’m a huge weather buff; however, I don’t like to travel in any type of incremental weather especially 12 inches of snow! I called us driving to the airport, Chapter 1; even though, it wasn’t too bad. We ended up being delayed 5 times for Chapter 2 where 8 of us hung out at a local pub. When we finally got the call that the flight was leaving, the locals cheered for us and it was quite the scene. Our early 2am arrival in Sanford, FL was Chapter 3 with the 2 1/2 hour road trip to Jupiter. After all of this though walking into Roger Dean stadium to watch the Cards play was amazing.

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The Chaheati as a Therapeutic Device

So you’ve finished using your Chaheati after a week-long camping trip or a tailgate event. What do you typically do with it afterwards? Like most people who own camp chairs, your Chaheati heated camp chair likely rolls around in the trunk of your car or sits in the corner of your garage or basement. Well, what else are you going to do with it? Consider this: you could be using your Chaheati in the home as a therapeutic device.
“Use my heated camp chair as a therapeutic device?” you’re probably saying. No, we haven’t lost it completely. Heat therapy has been used for centuries as a way to heal what ails us. It’s only recently though that medical professionals have fully understood what happens when we apply heat to stiff and achy muscles and joints.

Heat therapy can be used to lessen the pain associated with arthritis, for example. Heat has the tendency to increase blood flow to the heated part of the body. This increased blood flow applies not only to the joints but also to the muscles and skin. For those suffering from arthritis, this loosens up the joints and tends to reduce the pain levels associated with it. If you have ever had a grandparent complain about achy joints in cold weather, it may be easier to imagine how the Chaheati heated camp chair could be used as a therapeutic device.

But heat therapy isn’t reserved for only those with arthritis. Any active person who uses their muscles to lift, grab, run, or climb could benefit from heat therapy. Many athletes will use heat before a workout or event to increase blood flow and loosen up tight muscles. You can utilize this same therapeutic premise before your own workouts or physical activities with your Chaheati.

Finally, some folks who suffer from migraine headaches have figured out that heat can reduce the symptoms. Sometimes tight muscles in the upper back and neck (often brought on or amplified by stress) are the culprit for migraines. Many folks have been able to apply heat to these areas to loosen the muscles and lessen the strain. As the Chaheati features a fully heated back and bottom, which can easily be applied to many parts of the body. (Though, a heating pad may be needed for the neck.)

So know that your Chaheati is more than just a camp chair that keeps you warm. It’s also possible to look to its potential therapeutic heating ability as a reason to use it inside the home as well as outdoors. Happy heating!

(The content of this post shouldn’t be considered a substitute for medical advice. If you have chronic or acute pain, please consult a physician for the best advice on how to manage it.)

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Spring Activities: How to Enjoy the Outdoors More in the Spring

For many the call of spring means melting snow and cleaner homes. For others it’s a time of renewal and new-found motivation. And while temperatures still fluctuate between warm and brisk, there are plenty of reasons to enjoy the outdoors during the spring. In fact, there are many outdoor activities that are better done during a chilly spring morning or evening.

Camping during the spring can be a real treat due to the contrast of comfortable midday temperatures with brisk nighttime air. You may not notice this phenomenon as much if you live in the city, but those who reside in the country understand. Go hiking during the day in your shorts but then slide into your pants in the evening. By the time the sun has fully set, you’ll probably want to pull up a Chaheati and sit by the campfire. And in the morning you’ll be greeted to frosty or cold, dewy grass. If you’re prepared for both warm and cold temperatures, spring camping can be truly amazing.

While debatably a sport of opportunity, horseback riding ranks highly among spring activities for many of the same reasons. A cool spring morning is the perfect time to ride full gallop through a field or trot down a mountain trail. The chilly air racing across your face will remind you that you’re alive, while you fully enjoy the blossoming trees and flowers. If you don’t have horses of your own, planning an outdoor spring excursion with horses is still possible, especially through specialty travel agents like Hidden Trails.

When talking about spring outdoor activities, it’s difficult not to mention the barbeque. Lighting up the charcoal or gas grill for the first time acts as reminder that yes, spring is here. The first spring barbeque makes the perfect excuse to invite your friends and family over. When the cool night air arrives, pull up the camp chairs outside and keep the party warm by the fire pit. Share stories and catch up with what’s been going on with your friends. You may even feel inspired and begin planning your next spring outdoor vacation while your there.

This excellent springtime activity — great when the weather is still brisk — may surprise you: stream and river cleanups. The National River Cleanup initiative strives to keep citizens informed of the importance of the nation’s rivers and streams. With massive amounts of trash making its way into America’s streams and rivers each year, it’s important volunteers help with putting garbage where it belongs. Why is spring great for this? In early spring the ground is still slightly firm and easier to tread on in the morning, especially around waterways. Cleanups around the banks of rivers and streams are considerably easier when you’re not getting stuck in mud the entire time.

In all, there are plenty of reasons to enjoy spring outdoor activities. Don’t let a little bit of cool air indoors keep you inside. Let nature’s call of spring lead you out of the house and into the great outdoors.

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Support Your National Parks This Spring

Americans are increasingly turning to national park vacations as a cheaper travel alternative. In 2009, U.S. national parks nearly set a new record in overall attendance. And while numbers dipped again in 2010, overall attendance remains strong among the best national parks in the country. And for good reason: U.S. national parks are among the best in the world.

Despite the dip in attendance in 2010, several U.S. national parks set or nearly set new records. After seeing several years or attendance increases, Yellowstone National Park saw another record shatter last year, with over 3.6 million people visiting the park. Glacier National Park in Montana was another park that saw a surge of attendance in 2010, falling a mere 3,800 people short of its 1983 record of 2,203,847 visitors in 1983.

Yet whispers of a potential government shutdown are causing alarm, with concerns that a repeat of 1995’s nearly month-long closure of national parks could drastically affect those planning spring activities in those locations. Additional funding cuts to national parks are being proposed as part of the budgeting process occurring in Congress, drawing an even darker shadow. “We need to keep our national parks open and well-funded,” said John Gardner, a budget and legislation representative with the National Parks Conservation Association. “During a time of economic hardship, we need to adequately fund the places that protect our American heritage and draw tourists from throughout the world.”

It’s difficult not to agree with Mr. Gardner. Americans have been keeping travel more local over the last several years, meaning more tourist dollars for already cash-strapped states. It would be a shame if national parks had to shut down because of budget issues. That’s why it’s more important than ever to support your national parks. Grab your national parks pass, camp chair, and tent, and see America’s beauty. Let your representative know that national parks should be free of the whims of politicians. Tell them that national parks are not merely local draws: people from around the world wish to experience our natural wonders.

Finally, if national parks do get shut down this spring, don’t be afraid to turn to state parks or private museums for your vacation. State parks and attractions are having their share of budget woes. They often don’t have the same pizzazz as national parks, but there’s still plenty to be discovered.

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Hitting the Open Road with Chaheati

So you’ve decided to hit the open road with your RV and see America? With nearly 50,000 miles of interstate highway in the United States, you’re guaranteed to pass through interesting terrain and see some amazing sites. Of course, you’re going to want to stop in many places along the way. RV parks, campgrounds, and even the middle of nowhere may suit you well. But you’re probably not going to stay cooped up in your RV the entire time either.

When you finally do settle on a place to park your RV, you’ll want to enjoy the great outdoors. That means hiking, grilling, or relaxing around a campfire. And when you’re ready to relax, why not relax in comfort? That’s why you brought your Chaheati heated camp chair with you on your RV trip.

Any time of year is the right time for Chaheati! It makes the perfect travel companion. Why? It was designed with many purposes in mind, and our conclusion was that it had to be both versatile and durable. For example, you’re probably going to be opening and collapsing your camp chairs frequently as you travel from stop to stop. You want a chair that’s going to stand up to a lot of physical handling. But you also want your camp chair to be portable and easy to stow when you are on the move again in your RV. Chaheati meets all these needs and more.

Many folks go on year-long adventures in their RV, passing through a wide variety of weather conditions. Of course, Chaheati is the perfect camp chair for these kinds of changes! It may be the middle of summer, but spending the night in the mountains could still get chilly. That’s when you plug in your Chaheati battery pack and select one of four temperature settings. Within seconds your chair is warm and ready for you to sit in. And when you’re in warmer conditions the following week, you simply leave off the rechargeable battery and enjoy a comfortable seat.

The chair is also tough on moisture. The water-resistant fabric is durable, helping to keep moisture away from the ultra-thin heating elements woven into it. So on those days when you get an unexpected rain shower, leaving your Chaheati in the elements isn’t a problem. And don’t worry about extreme heat either: the fabric is fire-resistant as well.

So before you head out on your next RV trip — whether it’s across the state or across the country — be sure to stow your Chaheati heated camp chair. And don’t forget to bring your 12V car charger as well. With it you’ll ensure that you have a warm seat any time you please.

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5 US Spring Festivals You Don’t Want to Miss

Spring is here, and with it comes thoughts of housecleaning, hikes among blossoming trees, and spring festivals. If you’ve been cooped up in the house this winter and are looking for a reason to get outdoors, here are five spring festivals worthy of enjoying.

Atlanta Dogwood Festival

The Atlanta Dogwood Festival is celebrating its seventy-fifth year in 2011. This lively spring festival runs April 15–17 and features an impressive collection of fine art, historical displays, and literary activities during the full blooming of the dogwoods. Fans of “Gone with the Wind” can also join the outdoor festivities as the famous novel also celebrates 75 years of existence. As part of the celebration, the Margaret Mitchell House is offering free admission to the museum. Stay up-to-date on the goings on by following the event on Facebook.

Austin’s South by Southwest Festival

Technically this music, film, and interactive festival occurs at the end of winter, but it’s still close enough to spring to include it here. Running from March 11–March 20, this spring music festival always draws huge crowds of people who grab a chair and watch some of the best music and film currently available. This year’s South by Southwest (SXSW) celebrates 25 years of all things music and film and is bound to include numerous interesting guest speakers and artists.

D.C.’s Cherry Blossom Festival

This spring festival is in its ninety-ninth year of celebration and gearing up for its centennial event in 2012. The Cherry Blossom Festival has its origins in the mass gifting of 3,000 cherry blossom trees to the U.S. by government officials in Tokyo, Japan. Since then, the people of Washington, D.C. have celebrated the Cherry Blossom Festival as a way to celebrate the coming of spring and honor the relationship between the two countries. This year’s festival takes place between March 26 and April 11 and provides the perfect excuse to enjoy the outdoors in the nation’s capital.

New Orleans Wine and Food Experience

In 1991, a group of New Orleans food and wine enthusiasts envisioned a large charity event celebrating the wine and cuisine of the region. A year later the New Orleans Wine and Food Experience was born. This is one of the biggest spring events in New Orleans, after its well-known Mardi Gras. This year’s event will be held from May 24–28, featuring big names like chefs John Besh and Susan Spice. Grab a chair, sit down, and enjoy a full-flavor experience. Who knows: maybe you’ll find a great wine to enjoy by the campfire.

Towsontown Spring Festival

Located about 20 to 30 minutes north of Baltimore, the community of Towson, MD has been hosting its spring festival since 1968. With humble beginnings in the local arts, the Towsontown Spring Festival is now one of the largest spring festivals on the East Coast. This outdoor festival is family-friendly, featuring a wide array of things for children and adults to do. This year’s events are scheduled to take place on April 30 and May 1 in Downtown Towson.

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Baseball Spring Training Action Is Heating Up

The crack of a bat, the smell of roasted peanuts, and the end of winter all signal the return of baseball in the United States. People are grabbing their camp chairs and loading up vehicles to head to spring training baseball games and catch a glimpse — or a souvenir — of an old familiar player or an up-and-coming rookie. It gives teams the opportunity to gauge how their minor league talent is developing, often giving more proven talent the opportunity to compete for a spot on their associated MLB team.

For those who don’t know, baseball spring training is split up into two leagues: Cactus League and Grapefruit League. The Cactus League games are played in Arizona, while the Grapefruit League games are played in Florida. Most East Coast teams have spring training complexes in Florida, and West Coast teams have theirs in Arizona. There are a few exceptions, however. The Cleveland Indians and Cincinnati Reds are examples of teams closer to the East Coast with spring training complexes in Arizona.

Pitchers and catchers reported to camp for all MLB teams by February 17, with position players reporting in four to seven days later. The first spring training exhibition game began February 24 with Florida State University losing to the Philadelphia Phillies 8–0 in the Grapefruit League. Cactus League play revved up the next day, with the defending World Series champion San Francisco Giants narrowly beating the Arizona Diamondbacks 7–6. Since then things have been really heating up in spring training in both leagues.

For many young players spring training baseball is a real opportunity to prove they’re ready to play in The Bigs. Take for example the St. Louis Cardinal’s recent loss of Adam Wainwright at the beginning of spring training. The Cardinals are talking about filling Wainwright’s role from within, meaning both veterans and young players will have a shot to compete. Similar competitions are occurring in other spring training camps right now, adding extra excitement to the sport.

There’s no doubt that people are excited about heading outdoors and enjoying the warmer weather of Florida and Arizona spring training. Baseball fans take this stuff seriously. You can find all sorts of spring training guides and early player reports on most any major sports network. Some fans are so serious about it that they’re not afraid to give their picks for the best food in Arizona and Florida. And with a reported 2.87 million reported fans in attendance in both leagues last year, the popularity of spring training baseball looks to remain strong.

Here are some additional resources that may help you keep up with the latest developments in MLB and MiLB spring training games:

Cactus League spring training schedule
Grapefruit League spring training schedule
Subscribe to the official Spring Training Newsletter

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Popular St. Patrick’s Day Parades Around the US

St. Patrick’s Day parades are soon approaching, and with it signs of the end of winter. People are grabbing their kids and camp chairs and heading out in droves to historic parades around the U.S. But where are some of the most popular St. Patrick’s Day parades going to be this year?

Chicago: Saturday, March 12, 2011, 12:00 p.m.

You know St. Patrick’s Day is a big deal in a city when the government allows a major waterway to be dyed green. This is exactly what happens at the Chicago St. Patrick’s Day Parade. People head to Michigan Ave. and Wacker Dr. at the river a little before 10 a.m. to watch the dyeing. Afterwards everyone heads off to the parade route. This particular parade first started in 1843 and has since rapidly increased in popularity and attendance. Expect this year to be no less crowded than the past; get there early!

New York City: Thursday, March 17, 2011, 11:00 a.m.

The New York City St. Patrick’s Day Parade is the longest-running annual St. Patrick’s Day parade in the world. It’s said that Irish soldiers serving under Great Britain/Ireland’s King George III first organized the parade in 1762 as a way to show pride for Ireland and its culture. Today the parade ranks as the most attended parade in the United States and lasts for between five and six hours. People grab their camp chairs and stake an early claim along Fifth Street to witness the legions of military and emergency personnel, marching bands, and floats.

Savannah: Thursday, March 17, 2011, 10:15 a.m.

The origins of this St. Patrick’s Day parade lie with the Hibernian Society of Savannah, Georgia. Back in 1813, a group of Irish protestants came together to celebrate St. Patrick and Irish culture. In 1824 the Hibernian’s invited the public to attend the first public Irish Day Parade in Savannah. The parade has been an annual event since, drawing over 300,000 people to sit down and watch the floats and bands, and sing classic Irish songs.

South Boston: Sunday, March 20, 2011, 1:00 p.m.

In 1737, the Charitable Irish Society of Boston was founded on St. Patrick’s Day. It’s said that this group gave its thanks to St. Patrick, making it one of the first recorded honors to the Saint in the U.S. (Contrary to popular belief, it doesn’t appear that a parade was also held that year.) Fast forward to today, a time when nearly 24 percent of Boston’s population is made up of Irish decent. From this it’s easy to see why Boston takes its St. Patrick’s Day parade seriously, making it the second-most popular Irish Day Parade in America. Rain or shine, people head outdoors to catch glimpses of bagpipers, horse-drawn carriages, and floats.

St. Louis: Saturday, March 12, 2011, 12:00 p.m.

The St. Louis St. Patrick’s Day Parade may not be as old or steeped in tradition as other parades in the U.S., but the folks in St. Louis know how to do it right. This is year 42 for the parade, which runs down historic Market Street. The morning of the parade, the thirty-third annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade Run will take place, pitting nearly 12,000 people against each other in a five-mile run through the heart of the city. Afterwards, hundreds of thousands of people will head outside to watch bands, balloons, and floats pass by, followed by tons of fun at the Irish Village.

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Chaheati’s Advanced Heating Technology

We talked previously about the technology behind the Chaheati heated chair, but we wanted to specifically discuss the heating technology today. We originally said that when we designed the Chaheati, we tried to avoid a bulky, obtrusive heating coil. Not only would it weigh down the chair during transport, but such a rigid coil would be prone to bending damage. And we can only imagine how comfortable such a heating unit would be to sit on.

What we ended up settling on is a technology involving a little something called Far Infrared Rays (FIR). What does this mean? Well, FIR is merely infrared energy at a higher wavelength than that of the visible light radiated from the sun. This infrared energy easily penetrates human tissue, warming the skin quickly. But don’t confuse it with ultraviolet light, which is responsible for giving us sunburn.

If you’re still confused, think of infrared energy this way: you still feel warm even after applying a coat of sunscreen. Why? The sunscreen blocks only the ultraviolet light, not the infrared light, which warms you. That same sort of infrared energy safely keeps you warm while sitting in the Chaheati.

So how does Chaheati tap into this infrared energy to efficiently heat it? Rather than using traditional metal wires and running high-voltage electricity through it to heat you, we opted to use carbon fibers panels to capture and transmit energy in the form of heat from FIR. Our heating system utilizes a lightweight, low-voltage lithium-ion battery to provide energy to the carbon fibers, which in turn radiate energy. You stay naturally warm at a lower temperature because FIR penetrates skin more readily. The added benefit is that you end up with longer battery life than you would with a more conventional heating system.

We hope that that better explains the tech behind the heating unit but in a relatively simple manner. As always, if you ever have any questions for us, contact us. We’ll get to your questions as soon as we can.